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Beijing taster overview
Great Wall Badaling section

Badaling Great Wall

Walk along one of the most famous structures on the planet - a symbol and icon China, a feat of human engineering and a true wonder of the world. The Great Wall stretches 6,259 kilometers across the top of the country, and was begun around 200 BC to stop invasions from the north. Completed in medieval times, it was the longest building project in history. Badaling has one of the best-preserved sections of the wall.

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Walk along this legendary wall – a feat of human engineering and a new wonder of the world.

China’s Great Wall is one of the most famous structures on the planet, and a symbol and icon of the nation. Starting at Hebei Province in the east, it stretches for a total of 6,259 kilometers to Lake Lop near the Taklamakan Desert in the Muslim region of Xinjiang – China’s most westerly province. The wall was begun in the Qin Dynasty (220-206 BC) during the reign of the first emperor and completed during the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) making it the longest building project in history. The Great Wall’s purpose was to stop invasions by northern nomads – particularly from Mongolia – and consisted of high fortifications dotted with watch-towers. If the guards in a certain tower spotted invaders, they would fire gunshots to warn others along the wall. One shot means 100 invaders, two shots meant more than 500, and three signified more than 1,000.

It is possible to visit the Great Wall at several points along its course, many around Beijing. The most popular are Badaling, Mutianyu and Jinshanling. Of these, Badaling is the best preserved and the most frequently visited. It is famous as the place where President Richard Nixon viewed the wall on his history-making visit to China in 1972, and was climbed by Mao Zedong and 370 dignitaries and celebrities from around the world. Badaling and its nearby expressway were used as the finishing circuit of the Urban Road Cycling Course in the 2008 Summer Olympics.

The Badaling section of the Great Wall was declared a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage site in 1988, and became one of the New Seven Wonders of the World in 2007. Badaling means “reach eight directions”, because of the area’s many natural ridges that. The site is located in Yanqing County, about 70 kilometers north of Beijing, and runs for 7,600 meters with an average altitude of over 1,000 meters. This part of the wall was built in 1505 during the reign of Ming Dynasty emperor Hong Zhi. It has been open to the public since 1957 – the longest of any section.

The outside casing of the wall is made of 1000-kilogram granite slabs; the interior was formed by packing earth and small rocks tightly together. The wall averages 7.8 meters in height and 5.7 meters in width, and features crenellations for archers, a barrel-drain and a moat both inside and outside, along with the watch-towers that were used as firing posts.

A true wonder of the world, the Great Wall of China is one of the earth’s most important cultural relics. Spend some time walking along its ancient fortifications to experience living history.

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Ming Tombs and Sacred road

Ming Tombs & Sacred Road

See the tombs of thirteen great Ming Emperors set in rugged terrain outside of Beijing, accessed by an avenue guarded by giant animal statues. Located 50 kilometers north of Beijing, this necropolis is dedicated to thirteen emperors of the great Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), and covers 40 square kilometers at the foot of the Jundu Mountains.

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See the tombs of thirteen great Ming Emperors set in rugged terrain outside of Beijing.

Fifty kilometers north of Beijing lies a necropolis dedicated to thirteen emperors of the great Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), rivaling Egypt’s Valley of the Kings in scope and historic importance. The mausoleums and tombs of the emperors are spread over an area of 40 square kilometers in an arc shape that conforms to ancient “feng shui” principles of geomancy. It was believed that the evil winds coming down from the Jundu Mountains would be stopped by the arc, unable to reach the emperors’ remains. The tombs in the necropolis are incredibly well preserved, offering an important insight into the pomp and riches of Imperial China.

The site on the southern slope of Tianshou Mountain was chosen by the Emperor Zhu Di in 1402. The last emperor to be buried there was Si Ling in 1644. Only two of the tombs are open to the public – the grand Changling Mausoleum of Zhu Di, and Dingling, the underground burial place of Emperor Zhu Yijun, who was the longest serving Ming ruler. The Changling tomb covers 1956 square meters and includes a gorgeous palace made entirely of fragrant camphor wood. The Dingling mausoleum lies 27 meters below the ground.

The necropolis is accessed by the seven-kilometer Sacred Way, flanked along its length by 24 statues of guardian animals and 12 human figures. In imperial times, the emperor was known as the Son of the Heaven, and this divine boulevard was designed as the road down which he would return to his heavenly home after death. The Sacred Way begins with an enormous stone memorial archway dating back to 1540, It is the oldest and largest surviving stone archway in China.

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Olymic stadium bird nest

Birds Nest

See the centerpiece of the 2008 Olympics – a uniquely designed stadium that is symbolic of Beijing’s future. When the Olympic Games came to China in summer 2008, the eyes of the world turned to the nation’s capital. The centerpiece of the event was the National Stadium, nicknamed the “Bird’s Nest” thanks to its distinctive shape. Designed by Swiss and Chinese architects, it has room for 91,000 people.

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See the centerpiece of the 2008 Olympics – a uniquely designed stadium that is symbolic of Beijing’s future.

When the Olympic Games came to China in summer 2008, the eyes of the world turned to the nation’s capital. Beijing was in the spotlight, and it didn’t disappoint. The centerpiece of the games was the National Stadium, nicknamed the “Bird’s Nest” thanks to its distinctive shape.

The Bird’s Nest was the sight of the impressive opening and closing ceremonies of the Olympics, as well as the track and field events. It was designed by Swiss architects Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron with help from Chinese designer Li Xinggang, and features exposed steel “ribbons” enclosing an inner shell. Construction began in December 2003 and was finally completed in March 2008 after a brief halt while the design was amended.

The stadium has 91,000 seats - 80,000 permanent and 11,000 temporary. It covers 258 square meters and cost 226 million yuan (33 million US dollars) to construct. Since the Olympics finished, it has been used as a ski center, an exhibition hall, and a tourist attraction. It is located in the Olympic Green Village in Chaoyang District, near to the “Water Cube” aquarium.

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Beijing duck

Peking Duck

Experience the flavor of Beijing with the legendary dish that symbolizes the capital’s cuisine. A delicacy that has spread across the world, Peking Duck is at its most authentic in the city of its birth. Such is its importance that many people say: “You haven’t truly visited Beijing unless you’ve eaten Peking Duck”. Wrap the shredded duck meat and crispy skin in a pancake with plum sauce and spring onions, and enjoy the unforgettable taste of the city’s signature dish.

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Experience the flavor of Beijing with the legendary dish that symbolizes the capital’s cuisine.

Think of Beijing’s food and your mind will most probably turn to Peking Duck. A delicacy that has spread across the world, this dish is at its most authentic in the city of its birth. Such is its importance that many people say “you haven’t truly visited Beijing unless you’ve eaten Peking Duck”.

The origins of the dish are shrouded in mystery. One story goes that Marco Polo introduced the tradition of roasting poultry to the Chinese, while other sources claim that Nanjing was the first city to prepare ducks in this way during the Northern and Southern Dynasty (430-589). When the capital was moved to Beijing, the tradition followed. It was during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) that Peking Duck rocketed in popularity, thanks to its inclusion on imperial menus.

The modern cooking process has changed little since the early days. Ducks from the Peking White breed are killed and plucked. Their entrails are removed and air is blown between the skin and the body. This is later filled with water, and the duck is suspended on a hook. The skin is allowed to dry, and is brushed with sugar. After 30 to 40 minutes in a smokeless oven heated to 270 celcius, the duck turns deep red and is ready to be eaten. The chef will bring your duck to the table and slice it while you watch, making sure to leave the skin on while shredding the flesh.

The traditional way of eating Peking Duck is to place the sliced meat on a thin pancake with plum sauce, shredded cucumber and spring onion, then roll it up and pinch it between chopsticks. If you haven’t tried it before, you’re sure to be impressed by the rich flavors and tender texture of the meat.

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